Daily US Equity Market Company Benchmarking Data

Investment Data
S&P500
Russell 1000 and 2000 Companies
SEC
Updated Daily

Updated daily, US equity market benchmarking data with financial statements and technical price indicators for 3,000 US public companies

Applications

  • Fundamental analysis
  • Russell 3000 company performance benchmarking
  • Creating daily investment strategies
  • Value Investing with the calculation of strength and growth KPI's

DOCUMENTATION

Daily US Equity Market Company Benchmarking Data

Overview

Updated daily, this database provides a daily performance snapshot with financial statements and technical price indicators and ratios for 3,000 US public companies.

The data is updating everyday directly from company filings of Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

SEC is an independent agency of the United States federal government. The SEC holds primary responsibility for enforcing the federal securities laws, proposing securities rules, and regulating the securities industry, which is the nation's stock and options exchanges, and other activities and organizations, including the electronic securities markets in the United States.

Ticker Coverage

This data product covers Russell 1000 (large-cap) and Russell 2000 (small-cap) companies. Russell 3000 index covers approximately 98% of the total US Equity market-cap. S&P 500 companies are also included in this list.

  • Russell 3000 Index is a market-capitalization-weighted equity index maintained by FTSE Russell that provides exposure to the entire U.S. stock market. The index tracks the performance of the 3,000 largest U.S.-traded stocks which represent about 98% of all U.S incorporated equity securities.
  • Russell 2000 Index is an index measuring the performance of approximately 2,000 smallest-cap American companies in the Russell 3000 Index.
  • Russell 1000 Index is a subset of the Russell 3000 Index, represents the 1000 top companies by market capitalization in the United States.
  • S&P 500 is a market-capitalization-weighted index of the 500 largest U.S. publicly traded companies. The index is widely regarded as the best gauge of large-cap U.S. equities. (S&P stands for Standard and Poor, the names of the two founding financial companies.)
  • The data contains all primary line items from of the latest company filings of financial statements (income statement, balance sheet and cash-flow items.
  • The database is updated within 24 hours of the form 10 SEC filing, often within 12 hours.

Data Collection Methodology

  • Data updates everyday from Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) covering all new company filings
  • The prices and relavant price calculations are updated daily, end of days
  • All the company filings are cleansed and organized to provide a ready for analysis dataset for the investors
  • Latest financial statements are standardized for every company

Key Features

  • Updated Daily
  • Covers Russell 3000 Companies
  • Daily updated snapshots of company's 10-Q (Quarterly) and 10-K (Annual) filings
  • Daily updated technical price indicators
  • Standardized financial statements

Data Provider

Alta Bering

Until a few decades ago majority of us were employed in real world businesses. Alta Bering came out of a history of production technology and reconciled it with sophisticated algorithmic math, an after-thought in enterprise system functionality.We believe efficiency is key to mitigating scarcity economics. In the early 2000s, we set our sights on helping companies achieve higher efficiency and growth, not just growth.Today we enable advanced prescriptive analytics for data scientists and enterprise cloud platforms. Our goal is to help business analysts step up to corporate responsibility.Contact us for more about how we deliver our predictive analytics consulting to large and medium sized clients.

DATA DICTIONARY

138 Data Columns

Row Index (row_index)

Row Index of Data

Ticker (ticker)

The one to four or five character identifier for each security

Name of registrant (name)

This corresponds to the name of the legal entity as recorded in EDGAR as of the filing date.

Statement Date (statement_date)

Last Financial Statement Date of the company

Price Date (price_date)

Last Price Date of the Company

Is Delisted (is_delisted)

T(rue) if the ticker is listed out of market, otherwise F(alse)

Is NASDAQ 100 (is_nasdaq100)

T(rue) if the ticker is listed in NASDAQ 100 index, otherwise F(alse)

Is S&P 500 (is_sp500)

T(rue) if the ticker is listed in S&P 500 index, otherwise F(alse)

Is Russell 1000 (is_russell1000)

T(rue) if the ticker is listed in Russell 1000 index, otherwise F(alse)

Is Russell 2000 (is_russell2000)

T(rue) if the ticker is listed in Russell 2000 index, otherwise F(alse)

Is Dow Industrial (is_dowindustrial)

T(rue) if the ticker is listed in Dow Industrial index, otherwise F(alse)

Exchange (exchange)

Security exchange name

Industry (industry)

Industry information of the company

SIC Industry (industry_sic)

SIC Industry of the company

Sector (sector)

Sector information of the company

SIC Sector (sector_sic)

SIC Sector information of the company

SPDR Sector (sector_spdr)

SPDR Sector information of the company

Day Open (open)

Open price at which a security first trades upon opening of the exchange on a quote_date.

Volume (volume)

The number of shares that exchange hands during a quote_date.  Volume may be quoted over longer periods of time such as a week.

Day Close (close)

The price per share for the last trade on the quote_date during regular market hours.

52-Weeks High Price (high_price_52w)

A 52-week high is the highest price at which a stock has traded during the previous year

52-Weeks Low Price (low_price_52w)

A 52-week low is the lowest price at which a stock has traded during the previous year

Previous Close (prev_close)

Previous close is a security's closing price on the preceding day of trading

Relative Strength Index (RSI) (rsi)

RSI (Relative Strength Index) is an index between 0 and 100 that measures market's view about a security relative to market, whether it is overbought or oversold. Its calculation is the index transformation of the ratio of average appreciation to average depreciation of the security.

RSI under 30 implies oversold security and above 70 overbought security. Oversold loosely means that everybody who would sell the security has already sold it so the security should start appreciating. Overbought loosely means that everybody who would buy the security has already bought it so the security should start depreciating. RSI is a fast leading indicator that can give false signals so it should be used with care.

Money Flow Index (MFI) (mfi)

MFI is an index between 0 and 100 that measures market participants' enthusiasm about a security, whether it is overbought or oversold. Its calculation is the index transformation of the volume weighted ratio of total dollar trade in up days to total dollar trade (both up and down days) over the past 14 trading days.

Typically MFI < 30 implies that the security is oversold security and MFI > 70 implies that the security is overbought security. Just like RSI MFI should be used with care when trading, and confirmed with other indicators.

Three Months Return (return_3m)

Percent change of a security's close price in the last three months.

One Year Return (return_1y)

Percent change of a security's close price in the last year.

4 Weeks Change (prev_change_4w)

4 weeks price change of the security

12 Weeks Change (prev_change_12w)

12 weeks price change of the security

10 Day Average Price (avg_price_10d)

Moving Average of close price over the past 10 trading days.

50 Day Average Price (avg_price_50d)

Moving Average of close price over the past 50 trading days.

200-day average price (avg_price_200d)

The average closing price for the past 200 trading days (~ three quarters)

10 Day Average Volume (avg_volume_10d)

Average number of shares traded in the past 10 trading days.

50 Days Price Standard Deviation (stddev_50d)

50 Days Price Standard Deviation

Price Deviation (price_deviation)

Ratio of close price to 50 day moving average price.

Bollinger Upper Band (bollinger_upper_band)

50 day moving average plus two standard deviations of closing price.

Bollinger Lower Band (bollinger_lower_band)

50 day moving average minus two standard deviations of closing price.

Bollinger Index (bollinger_index)

It indicates the position of Closing Price relative to Bollinger Bands®. Bollinger Bands® is plotted at 2 standard deviations around a 50-Day simple moving average of the stock price.

Bollinger Index is close to 1, when closing price is close to the higher band, it is close to 0 when the closing price is close to the lower band.

Beta (3y) (beta_3y)

Beta measures the relationship between the price movements of the security and those of the market. It's the coefficient of the regression of the security's returns on the market's returns. Positive beta shows security's likewise movement with the overall market and negative beta vice versa.

Beta whose absolute value is greater than 1 shows implies that the security is more volatile than the overall market. Similarly, a beta between -1 and 1 implies a less volatile security than the market. Beta can be calculated as the ratio of covariance of security returns and market returns to the variance of market returns. This equals the sum of product of market and security returns over the sum square of market returns.

Sharpe Ratio (sharpe_3y)

Sharpe Ratio is the Risk to Return ratio of an investment on a security. It is calculated as the ratio of the difference between the return from the investment for the given period to the square root of sum of square of security's daily returns.

A Sharpe Ratio close to 1 implies good performance of the security. A Sharpe Ratio of 3 is an excellent score. We calculate from monthly prices over three years.

Cash and Cash Equivalents (bs_cash_and_equivalents)

Cash and cash equivalents refer to the line item on the balance sheet that reports the value of a company's assets that are cash or can be converted into cash immediately. These include bank accounts, marketable securities, commercial paper, Treasury bills and short-term government bonds with a maturity date of three months or less. Marketable securities and money market holdings are considered cash equivalents because they are liquid and not subject to material fluctuations in value.

Net Receivables (bs_accounts_receivable)

Net receivables are the total money owed to a company by its customers minus the money owed that will likely never be paid.

Inventory (bs_inventory)

Inventory is the term for the goods available for sale and raw materials used to produce goods available for sale. Inventory represents one of the most important assets of a business because the turnover of inventory represents one of the primary sources of revenue generation and subsequent earnings for the company's shareholders. Inventory is a very significant current asset for retailers, distributors, and manufacturers. Inventory serves as a buffer between a company's sales of goods and its purchases or production of goods.

Other Current Assets (bs_other_assets_current)

Other current assets (OCA) is referred to as "other" because they are uncommon or insignificant, unlike typical current asset items such as cash, securities, accounts receivable, and inventory.

Current Assets (bs_current_assets)

Total current assets is the aggregate amount of all cash, receivables, prepaid expenses, and inventory on an organization's balance sheet. These assets are classified as current assets if there is an expectation that they will be converted into cash within one year. The total amount of current assets is frequently compared to total current liabilities, to see if there are sufficient assets available to pay for the obligations of a business.

Property, Plant & Equipment (bs_property_plant_and_equipment)

Property, plant, and equipment (PP&E) are physical or tangible assets that are long-term assets that typically have a life of more than one year. Intangible assets such as patents are not included in PP&E.

Intangible Assets (bs_intangible_assets)

An intangible asset is an asset that is not physical in nature and can be classified as either indefinite or definite. A common example of intangible assets is Intellectual Property.

Goodwill (bs_goodwill)

Goodwill is an intangible asset associated with the purchase of one company by another. Specifically, goodwill is recorded in a situation in which the purchase price is higher than the sum of the fair value of assets less fair value of liabilities.

Other Noncurrent Assets (bs_other_assets_noncurrent)

These are long term assets on a company's balance sheet other than the common long term assets such as Plant, Property & Equipment, Intangible Assets or Goodwill.

Noncurrent Assets (bs_noncurrent_assets)

These are the assets on a company's balance sheet that is expected to remain there for more than a year.

Other Assets (bs_other_assets)

Other assets are short term or long term assets that the company owns, benefits from, or uses to generate income that are not classified as one of the specifically itemized assets types.

Total Assets (bs_total_assets)

Total Assets is the sum total of all gross investments, cash and equivalents, receivables, and other tangible and intangible assets as they are presented on the balance sheet.

Short Term Debt (bs_short_term_debt)

This is the debt in a company's balance sheet that is due in less than one year. It includes the short term portion of long term debt.

Accounts Payable (bs_accounts_payable)

Accounts payable are amounts due to vendors or suppliers for goods or services received that have not yet been paid for.

Other Current Liabilities (bs_other_liabilities_current)

Other current liabilities is a balance sheet entry used by companies to group together current liabilities that are not assigned to common liabilities such as debt obligations or accounts payable.

Current Liabilities (bs_current_liabilities)

Current liabilities are a company's short-term financial obligations that are due within one year or within a normal operating cycle. An example of a current liability is money owed to suppliers in the form of accounts payable.

Deferred Tax Liability (bs_deferred_tax_laibility)

Deferred Taxes are tax provisions that are assessed by the taxing authority but are deferred. For example, when accelerated depreciation is taken as tax deduction, but the depreciation deduction on the income statement is lower than what is allowed by the tax code, a mismatch occurs which is recorded as deferred tax liability. This liability eventually is paid in the future years and tax books and income statements reconcile.

Long Term Debt (bs_long_term_debt)

Long-term debt is debt that matures in more than one year. For a borrower, long-term debt is a liability that must be repaid over the life of a debt instrument. For a lender it is an asset.

Other Noncurrent Liabilities (bs_other_liabilities_noncurrent)

These are long term liabilities that are not common. Most common noncurrent liabilities are long term debt and deferred taxes.

Total Noncurrent Liabilities (bs_noncurrent_liabilities)

These are the liabilities on the balance sheet of a company that have a term life of multiple years.

Other Liabilities (bs_other_liabilities)

Other current liabilities is a balance sheet entry used by companies to group together current liabilities that are not assigned to common liabilities such as debt obligations or accounts payable.

Total Liabilities (bs_total_liabilities)

Total liabilities are the combined debts and obligations that a company owes to outside parties. All assets of a company are either owned by the entity and classified as equity or are subject to future obligations which are recorded as a liability. On the balance sheet, total liabilities plus equity must equal total assets.

Retained Earnings (bs_retained_earnings)

Retained earnings represents the company's cumulative earnings that has not been paid out as dividends and is available to be reinvested in the business or to pay down debts. Retained earnings are part of shareholder's equity in the firm.

Additional Paid in Capital (bs_additional_paid_in_capital)

Additional paid-in capital is an accounting term referring to money an investor pays above and beyond the par value price of a stock. For example, most common stock have very small (less than a cent) of par value, however when it is issued during and IPO or stock option compensation, it may be offered at above the par value.

Treasury Stock (bs_treasury_stock_value)

Treasury stock is outstanding stock repurchased from stockholders by the issuing company. These shares are issued but not outstanding and are not included in the calculation of dividends or earnings per share (EPS). Treasury shares reduce shareholders' equity and are generally labeled as "treasury stock" or "equity reduction".

Other Stockholders Equity (bs_other_equity)

Other stockholder's equity are the equity line items in the equity account other than the ones specifically listed such as retained earnings and common stock.

Total Stockholders Equity (bs_stockholders_equity)

Stockholders' equity, also referred to as shareholders' equity, is the remaining amount of assets available to shareholders after all liabilities have been paid. It is calculated either as a firm's total assets less its total liabilities or alternatively as the sum of share capital and retained earnings less treasury shares.

Minority Interest (bs_minority_interest)

A minority interest is ownership or interest of less than 50% of an enterprise. The term can refer to either stock ownership or a partnership interest in a company. Typical minority interest is between 10% and 30%.

Total Liabilities and Equity (bs_total_liabilities_and_equity)

Sum total of total liabilities and stockholder's equity on the balance sheet of a company.

Total Revenue (inc_revenue)

Total Revenue is the total billings generated from normal business operations net of discounts and deductions for returned merchandise.

Cost of Revenue (inc_cost_of_revenue)

The cost of revenue the total cost of manufacturing and delivering a product or service to consumers. Cost of revenue is also called the Cost of goods sold (COGS) and it includes the cost of the materials used in creating the good along with the direct labor costs used to produce the good. It excludes indirect expenses, such as administrative and sales force costs.

Net Revenue (inc_net_revenue)

Total revenue less Costs of Revenue. Some companies do not report cost of goods sold and start their operations reporting with net revenue. For banks net revenue is the sum of net interest income plus non-interest income.

Selling, General & Administrative (inc_selling_general_and_administrative_expense)

Selling, general and administrative expense (SG&A) is the sum of all direct and indirect selling expenses and all general and administrative expenses of a company. The SG&A is comprised of all operating expenses of a business that are not included in the cost of goods sold such as corporate expenses, facility costs and marketing expenses.

Research & Development (inc_research_and_development)

Research and development (R&D) expense refers to the cost of activities a company undertakes to innovate and introduce new products and services. It is often the first stage in the development process of a new product.

Other Operating Expenses (inc_other_operating_expense)

Other operating expenses, also known as overhead expenses, is the amount which generally does not depend on sales or production quantities. These are all operating expenses that are not itemized in the Income Statement report.

Other Operating Income (inc_other_operating_income)

These are minor income lines that do not constitute sales related normal business of the company.

Other Operating Income Expense (inc_other_operating_income_expense)

This is a reconciling item that cover minor or unusual operating income or expense and is used to reconcile total operating income the its line items.

Operating Income (inc_operating_income)

Operating income is an accounting figure that measures the amount of profit realized from a business's operations, after deducting operating expenses such as wages, depreciation, and cost of goods sold. Operating income is the Gross Profit less Total Operating Expenses

Interest Expense (inc_interest_expense)

Interest expense is the cost incurred by an entity for borrowed funds. It represents interest payable on any borrowings – bonds, loans, convertible debt or lines of credit.

Income Tax Expense (inc_income_tax)

Income tax expense is the amount of expense that a business recognizes in an accounting period for the taxes assessed on its taxable income. It represents the taxes assessed which may not be necessarily the same as taxes paid.

Other non-Operating Expense (inc_other_nonoperating_expense)

These are small and uncommon items such as restructuring charge, amortization of unusual assets, etc.

Other non-Operating Income (inc_other_nonoperating_income)

These are uncommon items in the non-Operating activities such as income from equity method investments, custom IP development, or interest and dividend income from investments.

Other non-Operating Income Expense (inc_other_nonoperating_income_expense)

This is a reconciling item that cover minor or unusual non-operating income or expense and is used to reconcile total non-operating income to its line items.

Non-Operating Income Expense (inc_non_operating_income_expense)

These are non-operating expense items that a company did not report in another category.

Minority Interest Income Loss (inc_income_loss_due_to_minority_interest)

A minority interest is ownership or interest of less than 50% of an enterprise. The term can refer to either stock ownership or a partnership interest in a company. Minority interest income is reported on the consolidated income statement as a share of profit belonging to minority shareholders. The reporting of 'minority interest' is a consequence of the requirement by accounting standards to 'fully' consolidate partly owned subsidiaries.

Net Income (inc_net_income)

Net income is equal to net earnings (profit/loss) calculated as Gross Profit less total operating expenses, depreciation, interest, taxes and other income expense from continuing and discontinued operations.

Dividend Amount (inc_dividends)

The amount of dividends declared this period

Basic Shares Outstanding (inc_basic_shares_outstanding)

Outstanding shares refer to the number of stocks that a company actually has issued. This number represents all the shares that can be bought and sold by the public, as well as all the restricted shares that require special permission before being transacted. Total shares that can be freely bought and sold by public investors are called the float.

Diluted Shares Outstanding (inc_diluted_shares_outstanding)

Diluted shares are the total number of common shares of a company that will be outstanding and available to trade on the open market after all possible sources of conversion, such as convertible bonds and employee stock options, are exercised. Fully diluted shares include not only those which are currently issued but also those that could be claimed through conversion.

Earnings Per Share (EPS) (inc_earnings_per_share_basic)

Basic Earnings per Share (EPS) is net income of a company less any preferred dividends divided by the average number of common shares outstanding during the calculation period. Net Income less preferred dividends is also called the Net Income Available to Common Shares.

Diluted Earnings per Share (Diluted EPS) (inc_earnings_per_share_diluted)

Diluted EPS takes into account all convertible securities such as convertible bonds or convertible preferred stock, which are changed into equity or common stock. To calculate Dilutes EPS we take Net Income Available to Common Shares and divide it by Average number of Diluted Shares during the calculation period.

Profit Loss (cf_profit_loss)

Profit Loss is equal to net earnings (profit) calculated as sales less cost of goods sold, selling, general and administrative expenses, operating expenses, depreciation, interest, taxes and other expenses. This item is also referred to Net Income in the Income Statement.

Share Based Compensation (cf_share_based_compensation)

Stock-Based Compensation is a way companies use to reward their employees. Stock-based compensation is also popularly known as stock options or Employee stock options (ESOPS). If expensed and reported in the Income Statement, the exercising of the ESOPS by the employees results in a reduction in Earnings Per Share in the income statement. However, this is not a cash item so this expense is reversed in the Cash Flow Statement. However, if the company actually pays the difference between stock price and exercise price to the option holders, it results in a reduction in Owners’ Equity and Cash on the Balance Sheet, again impacting the Cash Flow Statement.

Depreciation (cf_depreciation)

Depreciation is an accounting method of allocating the cost of a tangible or physical asset over its useful life or life expectancy. Depreciation represents how much of an asset's value has been used up.

Income Tax Cash vs Provisions (cf_income_tax_cash_vs_provisions)

Provision for taxation in the income statement doesn't involve any cash inflow or outflow. It happens to be a non-cash item appearing on the debit side of the income statement. Hence, while preparing cash flow statement, this item is ADDED BACK to Net profit/(loss) and actual cash taxes paid are subtracted.

Change in Accounts Receivable (cf_change_in_receivables)

Recall that net income captures revenues and expenses based on the accrual method of accounting. As such, credit sales, in addition to cash sales, may be recorded as revenues.

The sales generated on credit are recorded on the balance sheet as accounts receivable, while cash revenues are recorded on the balance sheet as cash.

Change in Liabilities (cf_change_in_payables)

Change in operating assets and liabilities means changes in the following: trade accounts receivable, inventory, other current assets, accounts payable and accrued expenses, other current liability and other non-current liabilities.

Changes in Other Operating Activities (cf_other_cash_due_to_operating_activities)

Changes in other cash or noncash adjustments to reconcile net income to cash provided by operating activities that are not separately disclosed in the statement of cash flows.

Operating Cash Flow (cf_net_cash_due_to_operating_activities)

Operating Cash Flow is Net Income plus Depreciation and Amortization minus Change in Working Capital. It can be read from the Cash Flow Statements as Change in Cash due to Operating Activities

Proceeds From Asset Sales (cf_proceeds_from_asset_sales)

When a company sells an asset (say part of its PP&E) this total cash is not reflected in the income statement. Only the gain portion is reflected. The PP&E decreases in the Balance Sheet, and the cash proceeds from the sale are reflected in the Cash Flow Statement as positive cash.

Payments to Acquire Assets (cf_payments_to_acquire_assets)

Symmetric to Proceeds From Asset Sales, the cash outlay that a company makes to make a capital investment or buy another long term asset is not reflected as expense on the income statement. The Cash on the Balance Sheet Decreases through an entry in the Cash Flow Statement.

Other Cash Flows from Investing Activities (cf_other_cash_due_to_investing_activities)

Cash flows from investing activities is a line item in the statement of cash flows, which is one of the documents comprising a company's financial statements. This line item contains the sum total of the changes that a company experienced during a designated reporting period in investment gains or losses, as well as from any new investments in or sales of fixed assets.

Investment (cf_net_cash_due_to_investing_activities)

An investment is an asset or item acquired with the goal of generating income or appreciation. In an economic sense, an investment is the purchase of goods that are not consumed today but are used in the future to create wealth.

Proceeds from Issuing Debt (cf_proceeds_from_issuing_debt)

When a company borrows funds (issues debt), the incoming cash is not reflected in the income statement. Instead debt liability increases on the balance sheet as well as the cash inflow is reflected in the Cash Flow Statement as "Proceeds from Issuing Debt"

Repayment of Debt (cf_repayment_of_debt)

When a company repays its debt, the cash outflow is not reflected in the income statement. The liabilities in the Balance Sheet decrease and the cash outflow is reflected in the Cash Flow Statement.

Proceeds from Issuing Stock (cf_proceeds_from_issuing_stock)

When a company issues new stock and sells it to private or public investors, the incoming cash flow is not reflected in the income statement. Common Stock on the balance sheet increases the number of shares are diluted in the income statement (EPS possibly decreases) and the proceeds are reflected in the Financing portion of the Cash Flow Statement.

Repurchase of Stock (cf_payments_to_repurchase_stock)

A share repurchase is a transaction whereby a company buys back its own shares from the marketplace.

Dividends Paid (cf_cash_dividends)

Dividends are paid on the date designated by a company's board of directors as the payment date.

Other Cash Flow from Financing Activities (cf_other_cash_due_to_financing_activities)

Cash flow from financing activities which shows the net flows of cash that are used to fund the company. Financing activities include transactions involving debt, equity, and dividends.

Total Cash Flow from Financing Activities (cf_net_cash_due_to_financing_activities)

Total of cash flow from financing activities which shows the net flows of cash that are used to fund the company. Financing activities include transactions involving debt, equity, and dividends.

Effect of Foreign Exchange on Cash (cf_effect_of_foreign_exchange_on_cash)

This is the "Effects of currency translation on cash and cash equivalents" and it appears on the consolidated financial statements of companies who have both domestic and global operations. It does not apply to companies whose only operations are recorded in US dollars. Because the foreign exchange rate is not constant during a reporting period, and the foreign subsidiaries keep their account in their domiciled currency, a cash effect occurs which is reflected in the Cash Flow Statement.

Other Change in Cash (cf_other_change_in_cash_and_cash_equivalents)

This is a reconciling item and comprises of the relatively small and unusual line items that are listed in neither the operations side of the cash flows or cash flow due to investing or financing activities.

Change in Cash and Cash Equivalents (cf_period_change_in_cash_and_cash_equivalents)

Change in cash and cash equivalents that reports the value of a company's assets that are cash or can be converted into cash immediately. These include bank accounts, marketable securities, commercial paper, Treasury bills, and short-term government bonds with a maturity date of three months or less.

Revenue Growth yoy (kpi_revenue_growth_yoy)

This is the company's growth rate in net revenue over the previous one-year period. It expresses in percentage terms how much the current year's revenue has changed compared to the previous year's revenue. A positive value may possibly demonstrate better business performance over the prior year, expanding operations, or a successful marketing campaign.

Revenue Growth 3yr CAGR (kpi_revenue_growth_3yr_cagr)

This is the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) in net revenue of the company for the trailing three-year period. It is equivalent to the annual growth rate in revenue that would be required to generate the same total revenue growth over the prior three-year time period. A positive (negative) CAGR growth rate over the specified period may be indicative of a variety of factors, such as an increase (decrease) in overall business performance, increased (reduced) market share, a change in operations, or a different sales strategy.

Revenue Growth 5yr CAGR (kpi_revenue_growth_5yr_cagr)

This is the Compound Annual Growth Rate (CAGR) in net revenue of the company for the trailing five-year period. It is equivalent to the annual growth rate in revenue that would be required to generate the same total revenue growth over the prior five-year time period. A positive (negative) CAGR growth rate over the specified period may be indicative of a variety of factors, such as an increase (decrease) in overall business performance, increased (reduced) market share, a change in operations, or a different sales strategy.

Operating Income Growth yoy (kpi_operating_income_growth_yoy)

This is the company's growth rate in operating income over the previous one-year period. It expresses in percentage terms how much the current year's operating income has changed compared to the previous year's revenue. A positive operating income growth yoy value may be due to either increasing revenues or decreasing costs, and indicate how efficiently the core operations contribute to the profitably of the business.

Operating Income Growth 3-yr cagr (kpi_operating_income_growth_3yr_cagr)

This is the annual geometric average growth rate in operating income of the company for the trailing three-year period. It is equivalent to the annual growth rate that would be required to generate the same total operating income growth over the prior three-year time period. The CAGR Operating income growth indicates how well a company generates revenue through its core operations. A positive operating income 3-yr CAGR growth would better indicate how efficiently the core operations contribute to the profitabiliy of the business than would a positive Revenue 3-yr CAGR alone.

Operating Income Growth 5-yr cagr (kpi_operating_income_growth_5yr_cagr)

This is the annual geometric average growth rate in operating income of the company for the trailing five-year period. It is equivalent to the annual growth rate that would be required to generate the same total operating income growth over the prior five-year time period. The CAGR Operating income growth indicates how well a company generates revenue through its core operations. A positive operating income 5-yr CAGR growth would better indicate how efficiently the core operations contribute to the profitabiliy of the business than would a positive Revenue 5-yr CAGR alone.

EPS Growth yoy (kpi_earnings_growth_yoy)

This is the company's growth rate in Earnings per share over the previous one-year period. It expresses in percentage terms how much the current year's EPS have improved or declined compared to the previous year's EPS. The EPS Growth YOY value shows how much a company's per share earnings have increased or decreased with respect to the prior period. A positive EPS Growth YOY indicates improved profit generation and invenstment performance over the prior year.

EPS Growth 3-yr cagr (kpi_earnings_growth_3yr_cagr)

This is the annual geometric average growth rate in EPS of the company for the trailing three-year period. It is equivalent to the annual EPS growth rate that would be required to generate the same EPS growth over the prior three-year time period. The CAGR Earnings per share growth rate shows how much a company's total income is growing or declining over a three-year period. A positive Earnings 3-yr CAGR growth indicates an improving ability to generate profit and increasing attractiveness as in investment.

EPS Growth 5-yr cagr (kpi_earnings_growth_5yr_cagr)

This is the annual geometric average growth rate in EPS of the company for the trailing five-year period. It is equivalent to the annual EPS growth rate that would be required to generate the same EPS growth over the prior five-year time period. The CAGR Earnings per share growth rate shows how much a company's total income is growing or declining over a five-year period. A positive Earnings 5-yr CAGR growth indicates an improving ability to generate profit and increasing attractiveness as in investment.

Operating Cash Flow (mil) (kpi_operating_free_cash_flow_mil)

The cash generated (in millions) from a company's core operations, which are anything considered to be the the company's primary business activities. Operating cash flow measures the cash generated by these activities prior to accounting for cash changes due to financing or investing activities.

Operating Cash Growth yoy (kpi_operating_free_cash_growth_yoy)

This is the company's growth rate in operating cash flow over the previous one-year period. It expresses in percentage terms how much the current year's operating cash flow has changed compared to the previous year's. A positive value may indicate operational improvement in the company's core lines of business or an increase in core business activities.

Operating Income (mil) (kpi_operating_income_mil)

An accounting term that expresses the revenue (in millions) generated from operating activities, minus various operating expenses. Operating activities and expenses pertain to those activities considered to be the company's core or primary business activities. Operating expenses often include employee wages and compensation; costs of services, goods, or inputs; selling, general, and administrative costs, and various overhead costs.

Operating Margin (kpi_operating_margin)

A measure of a business's operating profitability expressed as a percentage. It measures the proportion of revenue available to a company after paying those operating expenses that are most closely associated with the products and services sold have been deducted.

Net Income (mil) (kpi_net_income_mil)

This is the net earnings generated by a company over the course of a specified period of activity. Net income is essentially the sum total of all revenues less all expenses (including interest and tax expenses) for that period. It measures the company's overall profitability.

Net Margin (kpi_net_margin)

A business's overall profitability expressed as a percentage. It measures the proportion of revenue available to a company after paying all operating and non-operating expenses arising over the recording period.

Operating Cash Flow to Revenue (kpi_free_cash_flow_to_revenue)

A measure of a business's cash generating ability. It is the proportion of the operating cash generated relative to the sales revenues generated during that period. It is an indicator of how well a company can generate and collect cash with respect to their core operations.

Market Cap (mil) (kpi_market_cap_mil)

The market value of a company's equity outstanding, in millions. It is calculated as the price of a share of stock, multiplied by the total number of shares outstanding in the market.

Enterprise Value (mrq) (mil) (kpi_enterprise_value_mrq_mil)

A figure used to determine the overall value of a business. This is the Market Cap of a company, increased by total debt outstanding, reduced by the company's cash and cash equivalents.

Enterprise Value to Sales (kpi_enterprise_value_to_sales)

A value multiple relating the enterprise value of the company to its sales revenue. This is generally a performance measure of the company's ability to generate sales, or as a basis for comparative analysis.

Enterprise Value to Operating Income (kpi_enterprise_value_to_operating_income)

A value multiple relating the enterprise value of the company to its operating income. This is generally a performance measure of the company's potential to generate earnings through its core operations, or as a basis for comparative analysis.

P/E Ratio (ttm) (kpi_pe_ratio_ttm)

A price multiple relating the current share price of a company to its earnings per share that were generated over the previous twelve months. It shows the stock price in terms of the multiple of the previous twelve month's earnings. It is computed as Price per Share/Earnings per share. This is a commonly used profitability measure, and is a basis for comparative analysis. The ratio is not meaningful company with small or negative earnings.

Price to Sales (ttm) (kpi_price_to_sales_ttm)

A price multiple relating the current share price of a company to its Sales revenue per share that were generated over the previous twelve months. It shows the stock price in terms of the multiple of the previous twelve month's sales. This is a commonly used measure of a company's ability to generate sales, and is a basis for comparative analysis.

Price to Book (mrq) (kpi_price_to_book_mrq)

A ratio comparing a company's market value to its accounting book value. It is also equal to its stock price per share divided by its book value per share. The ratio is reflective of how the company is valued in the market versus its accounting net asset value. The measure is commonly used to evaluate earnings potential, liquidation considerations, and in value investing decision making.

(XXX) KPI Leverage (kpi_leverage)

KPI Leverage

(XXX) KPI Fundamental Score (kpi_fundamental_score)

KPI Fundamental Score

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